Regional Activities

Income Generating Activities

Disability has often been associated with poverty; poverty is both a cause and consequence of disability. Poverty and disability reinforce each other, contributing to increased vulnerability and exclusion. The majority of PWDs find their situation affects their chances of going to school, working for a living, enjoying family life, and participating as equals in social life. Disability exacerbates poverty, by increasing isolation and economic strain, not just for the individual but often for the affected family as well. Children with disabilities are more likely to die young, or be neglected, malnourished and poor. PWDs who are denied education are then unable to find employment, driving them more deeply into poverty. Breaking out of the vicious cycle of poverty and disability becomes more and more difficult. DHAT facilitated the development of livelihoods for PWDs. Livelihoods play an important role in bringing about equitable distribution of income, which can contribute to poverty reduction for PWDs. DHAT over the years has realized that it is impossible to reach out to PWDs without giving due attention to their priority needs, which is dealing with poverty, thereby focusing on “Poverty reduction through productive activities”. DHAT’s mandate of capacity building includes strategies to enhance skills to improve productivity of livelihoods for PWDs to create wealth and economic growth.

IGA members have received training from Family Planning on condom distribution. Members of IGA who are doing petty trading eg. selling airtime, sweets, cigarettes, etc have between October and December 2014 distributed . The members who are positively living with HIV have become advocates at community level on treatment as prevention, raising awareness on testing and ART.



DHAT hosted 1 Health Dialogue (September 2014)

To increase the number of children and parents of children with Down Syndrome who are aware of their SRHR and HIV and AIDS thereby contributing to the reduction of the burden of disease related to HIV and AIDS, and to the attainment of universal access to SRHR. This dialogue included health workers who facilitated the dialogue. The dialogue enhanced knowledge around contraceptive use (for dual protection, safer sex, sexually transmitted infections) and where to obtain sexual and reproductive health services. It also facilitated increased understand of disability issues by health workers. The dialogue encourage and motivated young people to seek sexual health services including HIV, Counseling and Testing.



DHAT hosted a Health Dialogue (June 2014) with the Parliament Portfolio Committee on Health.

Growing a healthy community is a lifelong process, one that requires constant nurturing and persistence. Everyone has a role to play in building a healthier, more vibrant community. There have been many health dialogues (nationally, regionally and internationally) that have brought about positive change in people and communities. The MPOA and MDGs are such dialogues that have mapped the way forward for people, communities and nations to take action on HIV and SRHR issues. PWDs call for inclusion (through the UNCRPD) in all discussion groups; to increase their participation in the SRHR issues in order for their needs to be understood and how SRHR are tailored to their diverse needs.


As part of DHAT’s Advocacy Strategy dialogues on SRHR and HIV issues assist in cultivating participants’ understanding of the essential interconnectedness of all SRH issues, as well as creating space for formal healthcare representatives to understand how both systems can contribute to and cooperate on addressing SRHR and HIV issues.

DHAT hosted a dialogue on HIV and SRHR for PWDs with members of the health and HIV portfolio committees within Parliament to discuss HIV and SRH issues affecting PWDs. This was seen as a vehicle that ensures policies begin to acknowledge PWDs; and PWDs begin to be represented on the respective national coordinating authority and participate in creation and/or review of national frameworks.

Honorable F Munengami addressing participants


DHAT hosted 4 Community Dialogues (July – October 2014) to form an effective interpersonal communication platform that resulted in enhanced dialogue and debate around disability and SRHR. These were platforms for young people with disabilities, women and girls with hearing impairment, young men with hearing impairments, men and youths with disabilities. This was to raise their awareness on disability, HIV/AIDS and SRHR issues affecting them within their community.

The dialogues stimulated debate on disability and SRHR issues shifting the social norms, attitudes and believes of PWDs regards HIV/AIDS and SRHR. The dialogues resulted in increased knowledge of HIV/AIDS and SRHR.

Dialogues involved older persons as they are primary caregivers to persons with disabilities

Sexual Reproductive Health Workshop – July 2014

Objectives
To bring together PWD's to raise awareness on SRHR

The Disability, HIV and AIDS Trust has integrated Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in its Disability, HIV and AIDS programming to strengthen its Disability and HIV and AIDS programming in Zimbabwe. In November 2012 DHAT did a mapping exercise to identify available SRH services and challenges facing persons with disabilities in accessing these services. The lack of data showing PWDs access to SRH services makes it difficult to know where we are and what percentage of the constituency is able to access SRH available services. It was acknowledged by the mapping exercise that to achieve at least 30% access to SRH and HIV/AIDS by PWDs by 2015, there is urgent need to build strategic partnerships, involvement of the media, establish discussions forums to share lessons learnt, raise awareness of SRH issues and production and dissemination of information on SRH in accessible formats.

This workshop was designed to raise awareness and empower PWDs on their HIV and SRH and Rights; identify barriers and challenges that cause PWDs in accessing HIV and SRH and how to overcome them and too engage in lessons sharing with a view to building support systems within the communities that ensure inclusiveness.

Training Participants on group exercises


Disability Inclusion Workshop – June 2014

To bring together Stakeholders/CSOs who are working in the field of HIV/AIDS and SRH

The workshop was designed to raise awareness on disability and engage Stakeholders/CSOs on disability participation in HIV/AIDS and SRH activities as well as to identify barriers and challenges in disability inclusion. The workshop confirmed that stakeholders and CSOs did not understand disability and highlighted the need to continuously raise awareness that sensitises organisations, health services and the public in general. Some key issues raised included:

- Ensure billboards, posters, brochures and all other information relating to HIV/AIDS and SRHR should depict PWDs as part of the community;

- CSOs should work with Disabled Peoples Organisations( DPOs) for awareness raising information;

- Collaborate with disability service providers including community based staff and community health workers to understand how HIV/AIDS impact on the lives of PWDs.

- There is need to advocate for inclusion of PWDs into al HIV/AIDS and SRHR programmes. The inclusion of PWDs in these programmes will make their needs understood and improve programming;

- Ensure that PWs are able to contribute and to participate in information and training sessions. It was mentioned that PWDs should be empowered with relevant information and training so as to ensure that they can easily relay information to PWDs.


Participant with mentall disability


Participant with mental disability – the involvement of persons with mental challenges is key in HIV and SRH programming. In most cases the rights of women and girls with mental challenges are violated when it comes to SRH.


Think Tank Meeting 26 - 28 March 2014.

The Southern African AIDS Trust in collaboration with Disability HIV and AIDS Trust (DHAT) will host a Think Meeting to discuss advocacy issues for persons with disabilities in relation to Sexual Reproductive Health (SRH), HIV and AIDS.

The meeting will be a forum of discussion on development issues
relating to disability, SRH and HIV and AIDS, as well as a platform for exchange of experiences and lessons learnt with a view to influence government decisions on future policy development and legislative changes.

The objective of the meetings is to engage with powerful minds and influential social actors in the African Region and globally on disability, SRH, HIV and AIDS. The process will involve reviewing DHAT Regional Advocacy Strategy on SRH, HIV and AIDS and aligning it with research results and lessons learnt from other programmers, resulting in a more evidence based advocacy strategy for DHAT. Issues emanating from the Think Tank will guide DHAT in its programming both at national and regional level.

SAT partnership with DHAT dates back to 2007. SAT is a leading
enabler and partner to community mobilization and community systems strengthening on HIV and SRHR integration for equitable and inclusive health. The current SAT strategy has a clear focus on HIV and SRHR interventions for key populations including people with disabilities. Of particular interest for SAT is the need to address the gap in SRHR challenges facing people with disability as well as identifying community assets for addressing these.

DHAT has a shared vision and dedication to improve and promote the welfare of Persons with Disabilities (PWDs) in relation to SRH, HIV and AIDS. Advocating and Supporting Disability Transformation and Disability-sensitive HIV and SRH service delivery in the Southern African Region. It aims at achieving inclusion and full and meaningful participation of PWDs in socio-economic, SRH, HIV and AIDS interventions. The vision of DHAT is “A society free from HIV and AIDS, guaranteeing full inclusion of persons with disabilities.

The Venue will be in Johannesburg SA. Dates are 26 - 28 March 2014.

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SUMMARY of ICASA 2013 Symposium Disability & HIV in Africa: Leadership, Capacity, Strategies Muriel Mac-Seing from Handicap International opened the session highlighting that the World Health Organisation (WHO) 2011 World Report on Disability reveals that 15% of the world population (about one billion people) live with one or more disabilities. Hence universal access and the three zeros: zero infections, zero AIDS - related death and zero discrimination cannot be achieved without including the world largest minority – people with disabilities The first speaker in this session was Phillimon Simwaba from the Disability HIV and AIDS Trust (DHAT) a regional Disabled People Organisation (DPO) who focuses on advocacy on the intersection of disability and HIV. Mr. Simwaba highlighted that National Strategic Plans (NSP) in Eastern and Southern Africa do not include or only include rudimentary disability and that an organization like DHAT is involved in advocacy to change this lack of integration. He discussed a number of good practice examples and approaches that DHAT has been using in the past years. For instance DHAT has been advocating on SADAC level influencing the National AIDS Councils NAC. It has also been involved in the development of interventions such as the peer to peer counseling and training of deaf VCT councillors in Zambia. For more info visit our publications page to download the whole summary

http://harare.usembassy.gov/about-us/ambassador-bruce-wharton/speeches-and-statements/launch-of-dhat-documentary-life-through-my-eyes.html

SADPD/FODPZ Meeting 28 October 2013

The Federation Of Organizations Of Disabled People In Zimbabwe [FODPZ] in collaboration With The Secretariat Of The African Decade Of Persons with Disabilities {SADPD] organized a consultative workshop to sensitize partners on the need for the disability mainstreaming plan [NDMP] and further plan on the process for the development of the [NDMP]. The workshop was conducted on 28th of October 2013 at the New Ambassador Hotel in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Zimbabwe recently ratified the United Nations’ convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities [UNCRPD]. The development of the NDMP will contributes towards the implementation of the UNCRPD and other government policies. FODPZ is also undertaken a baseline study on disability mainstreaming in the country. The study will provide baseline information and preliminary findings that were presented during the workshop by the Consultant.

Implementation of various legislation, policies and conventions has been identified as major challenge in disability programming. Therefore, the implementation of the UNCRPD and its Optional Protocol will generate interest in reporting the achievements and challenges of both the domestication and implementation of the UNCRPD.
FODPZ
The development of the Road Map and its subsequent Disability Mainstreaming Plan [NDMP] is important in thinking beyond the strengthening of the current disability mainstreaming efforts in Zimbabwe. For this process to happen and be achieved, PWDs and their respective organizations must be empowered with rights and freedoms to ensure that they are included in the process of disability mainstreaming.

This “Workshop on the Road Map towards the Development of a National Disability Mainstreaming Plan [NDMP] is part of the inclusive consultative process to ensure that all partners and PWDs become aware of the efforts by the Federation of Organizations of Persons With Disabilities in Zimbabwe. This initiative is called the Communities of practice in Disability Advocacy and Mainstreaming (COPDAM) Project, facilitated by the Secretariat Of The African Decade Of Persons with Disabilities {SADPD] supported by the European Union

The workshop was attended by members of FODPZ, Government ministries, for example ministries of Social services, Justice and legal and parliamentary services, senators representing persons with disabilities, academician and the disability desk in the office of the president.

Zambia Trip 18 October 2013

Good Governance coupled with Good Management is important for sustainability of Disabled Peoples Organizations. Free and Fair Elections in Disabled Peoples Organizations to elect capable representative person is important. In picture, The Deaf Association of Lusaka held elections on 19th October 2013 to elect new office bearers for another term of office.



ARASA Training- 10-15 November 2014 Johannesburg South Africa

The AIDS and Rights Alliance for Southern Africa (ARASA) is a regional partnership of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) working together to promote a human rights-based response to HIV and TB in east and Southern Africa through capacity building and advocacy.

ARASA’s contributes to build and strengthen the capacity of civil society, with a particular focus on people living with HIV (PLHIV) and key populations at higher risk of HIV infection, to effectively advocate for a rights-based and gendered response to HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in east and southern Africa.

This is done with the objective of ensuring that the rights of PLHIV and those at higher risk of HIV; for example Persons with Disabilities are respected and protected and those socio-economic rights, the denial of which fuels the epidemic in the region, are respected, protected and fulfilled.

In the last three years DHAT has participated in the training through selected individuals involved in implementing DHAT programmes in the focus countries. After Training ARASA offers grants to participants on a competitive basis through submission of proposals to implement what participants learnt in their own countries,

In 2008, ARASA initiated a competitive small grants programme to facilitate the implementation of a set of time bound activities based on concepts explored and knowledge gained during ARASA’s annual regional TB, HIV and Human Rights Training of Trainers’ (ToT) course. An external evaluation conducted by Singizi Consulting in 2012, found that the small grants programme has created an important platform for organisations (through the individual grantees) to initiate and implement human rights-related advocacy campaigns. It also found that the reach of some of the small grants projects has been significant, particularly given the relatively small amount of the grant allocations. The evaluation recommended that some consideration be given to ways in which ToT graduates can be better “tuned in” to the ARASA network, as well as to opportunities for synergistic advocacy work. Thus, the 2014 grants will be offered to projects focused on human rights issues of concern in the context of HIV and TB in the region as identified by ARASA partners during the Annual Partnership Forum, which strengthen synergies with other in-country, regional and global advocacy agendas, thus maximizing the use of the limited resources available to civil society to undertake advocacy for human rights-based programming. It is anticipated that this approach will strengthen the sustainability of advocacy for human rights-based responses beyond the life cycle of the ARASA funded project.

Upon the successful completion of the Training of Trainers programme, trainers may apply for one of seven small grants up to the value of U$10 000 to implement projects focused on HIV, TB and human rights training, advocacy, research, policy review development and legal audits in the SADC countries, Kenya, Uganda and the Indian Ocean Islands.

Income Generating Activities


Disability has often been associated with poverty; poverty is both a cause and consequence of disability. Poverty and disability reinforce each other, contributing to increased vulnerability and exclusion.  The majority of PWDs find their situation affects their chances of going to school, working for a living, enjoying family life, and participating as equals in social life.  Disability exacerbates poverty, by increasing isolation and economic strain, not just for the individual but often for the affected family as well. Children with disabilities are more likely to die young, or be neglected, malnourished and poor. PWDs who are denied education are then unable to find employment, driving them more deeply into poverty. Breaking out of the vicious cycle of poverty and disability becomes more and more difficult. DHAT facilitated the development of livelihoods for PWDs.  Livelihoods play an important role in bringing about equitable distribution of income, which can contribute to poverty reduction for PWDs.   DHAT over the years has realized that it is impossible to reach out to PWDs without giving due attention to their priority needs, which is dealing with poverty, thereby focusing on “Poverty reduction through productive activities”.  DHAT’s mandate of capacity building includes strategies to enhance skills to improve productivity of livelihoods for PWDs to create wealth and economic growth.   
IGA members have received training from Family Planning on condom distribution.  Members of IGA who are doing petty trading eg. selling airtime, sweets, cigarettes, etc have between October and December 2014 distributed .  The members who are positively living with HIV have become advocates at community level on treatment as prevention, raising awareness on testing and ART.

DHAT hosted 1 Health Dialogue (September 2014) to increase the number of children and parents of children with Down Syndrome who are aware of their SRHR and HIV and AIDS thereby contributing to the reduction of the burden of disease related to HIV and AIDS, and to the attainment of universal access to SRHR.  This dialogue included health workers who facilitated the dialogue.  The dialogue enhanced knowledge around contraceptive use (for dual protection, safer sex, sexually transmitted infections) and where to obtain sexual and reproductive health services.  It also facilitated increased understand of disability issues by health workers.  The dialogue encourage and motivated young people to seek sexual health services including HIV, Counseling and Testing.

Participation in World AIDS Day


Participation in 16 days of Activism of Violence Against Women

Violence against Women (VAW) is a global problem that has seen many women and girls being killed, maimed or scared both physically and psychologically for life. Statistics also reveal that an estimate of seven out of ten women are beaten, raped, abused or mutilated in their lifetime and most of this violence takes place in intimate relationships. VAW poses a health risk for survivors (Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI’s), injuries, torture and trauma) with no knowledge and information on what to do and where to get assistance from while perpetrators get away with crime and may never be brought to justice.

DHAT participated in the 16 days in partnership with Women’s Action Group to raise awareness on violence against women with disabilities; sensitise women and girls with disabilities on VAW, causes, prevention and protection services.

Activities:

4 Radio programme : 15 minute radio programmes will be aired on radio Zimbabwe in Shona. Emphasis on awareness raising on different forms of violence suffered by women and girls with disabilities. Information on where help can be accessed will also be shared.

ZBC tv programme : 25 minute ZBC TV programme with highlights from the launch on the 16 days of activism.

Mini launch :After the national launch of the 16 days of activism against GBV, DHAT and WAG facilitated another commemorative event in Harare for persons with disabilities. This launch brought together women and girls with disabilities so that their issues are heard. Representatives from the Senate (2 Senators who represent disability), Ministry of Gender and Women’s Affairs; DHAT Board, Disabled Peoples Organisations and PWDs (including men) attended the launch. This launch has confirmed the need to develop a position paper that will influence policy development/change. A total of


DHAT Regional Mandate: To facilitate and advocate for comprehensive rights-based interventions that increase activity, participation and empowerment of Persons with Disabilities:

DHAT seeks to support, promote, and facilitate Interventions, and approaches that address vulnerabilities, empowerment needs and increase activity and participation of Persons with Disabilities. This is a largely strategic component that necessitates review, formulation, advocacy, networking, information sharing and dissemination on disability related policy and legislation in the countries and region.

DHAT further seeks to influence and work with regional leaders and stakeholders to have in place and implement systems that increase the activity, participation and empowerment of Persons with Disabilities.

The Disability, HIV and AIDS Trust regional work include activities that fall under the following programmes.

Advocacy

Advocacy is one of the activities that the regional office is involved in. The regional office facilitates for the umbrella organizations of Persons with Disabilities to carry out effective advocate work. The Disability, HIV and AIDS Trust conducts its advocacy programmes various activities with Disabled persons organizations, AIDS Service Organizations and other key players.

Coordination and Partnership Development

The Disability, HIV and AIDS Trust coordinates the programmes of the country offices in ensuring that implementation of programmes is in line with the mandate of the organization. The regional office has a responsibility of raising resources required to finance coordination of programmes. Other than programme coordination, the regional office also mobilizes, identifies and selects potential organizations that the Disability, HIV and AIDS Trust could collaborate with in its HIV and AIDS work.

Technical support

The Disability HIV and AIDS Trust also aim at improving skills of partner organizations in responding to HIV and AIDS. The support covers areas such as disability and HIV and AIDS programming, organizational development through workshops, exchange visits, setting up of operational systems and mentoring.

Resource mobilization

The Disability, HIV and AIDS Trust mobilizes and gathers financial, material and human resources for the development of programmes at both regional and country programme levels.. The regional office facilitates and assists local programmes offices to raise resources for programming.

Scientific Research and Documentation

The Disability, HIV and AIDS Trust collect baseline information on disability and HIV and AIDS and documents it. The organization also facilitates research based studies to underpin its advocacy work. Research studies are important to support advocacy work with evidence-based information that would help the Disability HIV and AIDS Trust to influence policy and legislation change in governments.

Monitoring and evaluation

In order to track the progress of programme implementation in the country office and partner organizations, the disability HIV and AIDS Trust conducts monitoring and evaluation of activities. A lot of quantitative and qualitative data and information are collected before and during programme implementation for this exercise. The monitoring and evaluation activities are all carried out with the involvement of Partners and stakeholders.



Additional information